Recommendations

Here’s your chance to talk up that great book you just finished, and/or put out a request for new reading material!  Just drop your comments or questions in the “What do you think?” box below.

8 thoughts on “Recommendations

  1. Ok I know we all have towering to be read piles, I have at least 40. On my kobo, and about the same in real books, notvto mention the ever growing list on my new kindle app on my tablet. But I have recommend Anderson Camilleri’s inspector montalbano series.

    Also Sue Grafton’s Kinsey millhone series

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I’ve just finished Sulari Gentill’s Rowland Sinclair series (https://www.goodreads.com/series/76938-rowland-sinclair).

    Great mystery/drama series about a wealthy young artist and his bohemian friends in Sydney, Australia, in the 1930s. Each book is a nice mix of drama, crime, and historical events. Sydney in the 1930s was rife with economic recession, crime, and political violence mirroring the global conflict between communism and fascism. Some books in the series are set in Hitler’s Germany or take place partly in the USA or UK.

    I don’t know Sulari personally but love her books.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Today I re-read Elizabeth Moon’s ‘Remnant Population’ for about the fourth or fifth time. It was a Hugo award winner in 1997 the year after it first came out. It is a first contact SciFi story but with a very different protagonist, a 70-year old woman who decides to stay when the rest of the colonists in a failed terraforming venture were removed. Reading this exceptional book so soon after immersing myself in another mature (if no quite so much) woman’s story in the Spy books changed the experience quite a bit from the last time I had read it. Just as good, just different. If you like good SciFi, I can heartily recommend Moon’s novels, particularly this one and her tour de force ‘The Speed of Dark’.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Sci-fi? Lots of good ones out there. Discovered Robert Heinlein forty-plus years ago and read everything he ever published, including some essays. Same with Steinbeck. Every published word.

    Lately? David Vandyke’s Plague Wars series. Pulled me in with a freebie, and my wife rolls her eyes every time another one shows up in her Kindle app. (Do I detect a trend here?)

    Jinx Schwartz’s “Just Needed Killin'” is good. Who wouldn’t like a lady engineer with a yacht and a dog named Pothang. As in, “You po’ thang!” That still makes me laugh.

    Bookbub is my friend. My addiction-feeding, relentless friend…that hits me every day with new temptations. Yep, my very good friend. Sorta. Ish…

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I just finished a great non-fiction work by Walter Isaacson. He normally writes biographies including the recent best seller about Steve Jobs. It is called The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution. It starts with Ada, Countess of Lovelace in 1837 and continues pretty much to the present. Rather than focusing on individuals, the author features the collaborations, the lucky accidents, and even popular culture that influenced/created today’s internet. Though I was familiar with much of the material, I had not looked at it in quite the way it was presented here. Also, I rarely read biographies so this was the first example of Isaacson’s writing I had encountered and I was pleasantly surprised at the wit and humor of his wording.
    If you are at all interested, Amazon has a sample available (the first chapter) at https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JGAS65Q?ref_=kin_pc_dp#reader_B00JGAS65Q

    Liked by 1 person

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